The whispers of “blue waffle diseases” started around the year 2010. It was when an alarming image of blue-tinted, pus-covered, and lesion-filled genitals began appearing on the internet.

Users on the internet claimed it was due to an infection that is sexually transmitted (STI).

Although there is a female in the photo, Blue waffle disease isn’t true. Unfortunately, the image remains a prevalent and fake image to this day.

We break down the myths about blue waffles and open how STIs can be contracted — and the best way to detect their presence.

Is Blue Waffle Disease a Hoax?

The assertions made with the picture were just as alarming as the image itself. For example, people claimed that the blue waffle was an STD only seen in those who have vaginas. Another popular claim contended that this particular STI was only seen in females with many sexual partners.

The name was derived from the slang words “waffle” to refer to the vagina and “blue waffle” to refer to a serious vaginal infection. Blue waffle disease is believed to cause bruising, lesions, and blue discolouration.

The medical community does not recognize any illness known by this name or is responsible for these symptoms – at the very least, it’s not that “blue” portion. Various STIs may cause bleeding and lesions in sexually active individuals who develop viral or bacterial infections.

How do you catch the blue waffle illness?

Blue waffle is not a disease because it’s an imaginary STI. However, there are some things one can take to safeguard yourself from sexually transmitted infections, such as the use of regular condoms, both internal and external and the reduction of your number of sexual partners.

What exactly does blue waffle disease appear like?

Blue waffle disease doesn’t exist. However, this doesn’t mean that you have to avoid variations in the colour or smell, or odour of your vagina. A red, inflamed vagina with burning, itching, and smelly discharge may be a sign of a real problem called vaginitis. It is often associated with STIs such as gonorrhoea and Chlamydia or trichomoniasis. 14

Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)

VV is among the most frequent vaginal infection that women suffer from between the ages of 15 to 44 years old, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)Trusted Source. It’s caused by an imbalance in the number of bacteria located in the vagina.

It’s not clear why certain women experience it, but certain actions that alter vaginal pH levels increase the chances of developing the condition. It includes having several or new sex partners, as well as douching.

The BV is not always the cause of symptoms. However, if it causes symptoms, it might observe:

  • thin vaginal discharge that appears grey or white
  • It’s a smell of fish that gets worse after sexual contact
  • vaginal pain, itching or burning
  • a burning sensation during urination

Chlamydia

Chlamydia can be prevalent and can be found at any age and gender. It is transmitted via vaginal, oral, or anal.

If not treated, Chlamydia could cause serious problems and alter the fertility of females. It is curable, however, only if you and your partner(s) are treated.

Most people with Chlamydia don’t show any signs. However, if you experience symptoms, they can take a while to manifest.

Vaginal symptoms can include:

  • abnormal vaginal discharge
  • burning when you go to the bathroom

Signs that something is wrong with the testicles or penis can be:

  • discharge of the penis
  • burning sensation during urination
  • the testicles, causing pain and swelling. or both testicles

If you suffer from anal sex or Chlamydia, it may spread to the rectum through an additional area, like your vagina, then you might notice:

  • rectal pain
  • The rectum discharges its fluids
  • bleeding from the rectal

Gonorrhoea

Every sexually active person is susceptible to contracting STI. Gonorrhoea may affect the female genitals and rectum, and throat. It is transmitted via vaginal, anal, or oral sex when you are with someone suffering from it.

Gonorrhoea can not trigger any symptoms. The symptoms that are possible depend on the gender of your partner and the location of the problem.

Someone with a penis could find:

  • burning sensations when you go to the bathroom
  • white, yellow or green discharges from the penis
  • The testicles are in pain and swelling in the testicles.

A woman who has a vagina can notice:

  • burning or pain when you urinate
  • Vaginal discharge increases
  • bleeding between periods
  • pain during sex
  • Lower abdominal discomfort

Rectal infections can be the cause of:

  • The rectum discharges its fluids
  • Pain
  • Anal Itching
  • rectal bleeding
  • painful bowel movements

Genital herpes

Genital herpes is caused by two varieties of herpes simplex viruses (HSV):

  • HSV-1
  • HSV-2

It’s transmitted via sexual contact. Most cases of genital herpes are because by HSV-2.

After contracting herpes, the infection is dormant within your body and may be reactivated. Unfortunately, there’s no cure available for genital herpes.

If you are experiencing any signs generally, they begin within two to 12 days upon exposure to the virus. However, about 90 per cent of people Trusted Source suffering from genital herpes will suffer from mild or no signs.

In the initial herpes outbreak, symptoms could be:

  • long-lasting lesions
  • The shedding of viral particles is more frequent, meaning the HSV will be more likely to be passed on to other people during this period.
  • febrile
  • swollen lymph nodes
  • The body is aching
  • headache

After these symptoms have gone away, the effects of herpes can appear repeatedly. However, when an outbreak is present, the symptoms tend to be less severe than those of the initial attack and likely will not be for as long.

The symptoms of recurrent outbreaks are prodromal symptoms.

In the case of herpes, they appear as painful genital areas and shooting discomforts in the lower body and typically develop over a while, usually a few hours or even days before the appearance of lesions. Nevertheless, the prodromal signs could alert you that you’re suffering from an outbreak of herpes.

Human papillomavirus (HPV)

HPV is the most frequent STI. As to HPV, which is the National Cancer Institute’s Trusted Source, there are over 200 kinds of HPV. Of the various HPV types, 40 types of Trusted sources can affect the mucous membranes. This comprises the genitals, the mouth, and the rectum.

Many sexually active people are affected by HPV throughout their lives. It’s transmitted via skin-to-skin contact and can impact the genitals, rectum, throat, and mouth.

Certain strains can lead to warts that are genital. Some can also cause cancerous growths, including tumours in the cervix or rectum, mouth and throat. However, the wart-causing strains aren’t identical to those that cause cancer.

The types of cancers that HPV may cause include Trusted Source:

  • cervical cancer
  • oropharyngeal cancers
  • anal cancer
  • cancer of the penile
  • vaginal cancer
  • Vulvar cancer

Most HPV infections are not treated and do not cause any symptoms or signs. However, the virus stays dormant within your body and can be passed on to sexual partners.

Genital warts resulting from HPV can be seen as small bumps or tiny bumps, or a group of nodes located in the genital region. They can vary in size, appear raised or flat, or appear like the appearance of a cauliflower.

Genital warts resulting from HPV are not the same as genital herpes.

Suppose you observe any strange changes, like bumps, discharges, or sores. See your physician get an STI examination whenever you can.

How do I get tests for genuine STIs?

As of 2018, which was the last time that the CDC released statistics on the subject, about 20 per cent of the Trusted Source from all of the U.S. population was living with STIs, there is no blue waffle disease because it doesn’t exist.

Many of these aren’t yet diagnosed, and that’s not just because of the non-specific or subtle manifestations of STIs.

STI testing is still associated with an unhelpful stigma, which creates a gap between those suffering from treatable diseases and the medical care they require.

If not treated, certain STIs may progress into complications that can lead to infertility and certain cancers. Therefore, it’s essential to ensure that those who are sexually active have an easy relationship with STI tests.

Who needs STI testing?

Sexually active people would probably be benefited from STI testing. This is especially true if:

  • You’re beginning a sexual relationship with a new companion.
  • You and your partner are set to begin having sexual relations without condoms or other contraceptive methods that block the barrier.
  • You often have sexual relations with several partners.
  • The partner you are with has had sexual relations in the past outside of your relationship and has more than one partner.
  • The symptoms you’re experiencing could be a sign of an STI.

Monogamous or long-term relationships might not require STI screening if they had undergone screening before their relationship. Unfortunately, many people do not take advantage of screening. It’s crucial to eliminate any STIs that don’t show obvious symptoms before their development into more serious complications.

You should be testing for STIs.

Ask a doctor’s advice regarding the STIs that require testing. It will be beneficial to you. Every person has their unique sexual situation, so it’s best to avoid having excessive concerns regarding STIs, which you’re not likely to experience.

A doctor or healthcare professional may recommend testing to determine the following symptoms:

  • HPV
  • Chlamydia
  • Gonorrhoea
  • HIV
  • hepatitis B
  • syphilis
  • trichomoniasis

It’s unlikely they’ll ask for an examination for herpes if you’ve been exposed to it or asked for the test in particular.

When you go for your routine health check-up, it is unlikely that they will check for any of these STIs. This is because most healthcare professionals don’t regularly test for any STIs.

Make sure to consult your physician regarding STI testing and verify which tests are in place. Honesty and transparency are essential in revealing your STI risk and can aid a medical professional in figuring out the best tests to suggest.

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